Potomac Surgical Arts, P.C.

We are a "state of the art" oral/maxillofacial and cosmetic surgery practice, dedicated to patient safety and satisfaction. We pride ourselves in being at the forefront of the latest techniques and technologies.

Craig E. Vigliante, M.D., D.M.D. Board Certified Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon
Fellowship Trained Cosmetic Surgeon

Dr. Vigliante graduated Valedictorian from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine in 1997. In dental school, he served in many capacities, including dental class president. Following dental school, he received his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medici

Operating as usual

05/13/2020

It's gorgeous out! We took a Socially Distance walk around our beautiful neighborhood at lunch. Get some fresh air and stay safe!
#EveryoneSafe #PotomacSurgicalArts
#wemissyou

05/05/2020

You are health is always our first priority. Go to www.potomacsurgicalarts.com to see
some of the many measures we are taking to keep patients and staff safe in the office. We are open. We can't wait to see you! Stay safe.
#potomacsurgicalarts
#everyonesafeinitiative

02/13/2020

Potomac Surgical Arts, P.C.'s cover photo

05/09/2013

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!! To The Best... Smartest... Coolest OMS in Loudoun Co. and Most of All The Best Boss Ever!!! Dr. Craig Vigliante:) Enjoy Your Day... Even Though We're Making You Work A Full Schedule On Your Birthday With The Best Boss... Comes Wishes From An Awesome Staff Jane, Guinea, Laura. Kathy, Nicola, Jessie.

[04/18/12]   Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to develop and appear in your mouth. They come in between the ages of 17 and 25, a time of life that has been called the "Age of Wisdom."

What is an Impacted Tooth?
When a tooth is unable to fully enter the mouth, it is said to be "impacted." In general, impacted teeth are unable to break through the gums because there is not enoug...h room. Nine out of ten people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth.

How serious is an impacted wisdom tooth?
If left in the mouth, impacted wisdom teeth may damage neighboring teeth, or become infected. Because the third molar area of the mouth is difficult to clean, it is a site that invites the bacteria that leads to gum disease. Furthermore oral bacteria may travel from your mouth through the bloodstream, where it may lead to possible systemic infections and illnesses that affect the heart, kidneys and other organs. [1] [2] [3]

Research has shown that once periodontal disease is established in the third molar areas, the problem is persistent and progressive, but may improve following extraction of the teeth. [4] [5] [6]

In some cases a fluid-filled cyst or tumor may form around the base of the untreated wisdom tooth. As the cyst grows it may lead to more serious problems as it hollows out the jaw and damages surrounding nerves, teeth and other structures.

Complications such as infection (fig. a) , damage to adjacent teeth (fig. b) and the formation of cysts (fig. c) may arise from impacted teeth.

(a) Infection

(b) Damage to neighboring teeth

(c) Cyst
Must the tooth come out if it hasn't caused any problems yet?
Many people believe that as long as they are not in pain, they do not have to worry about their wisdom teeth. However, pain free does not mean disease or problem free. In fact, wisdom teeth that come in normally may still be prone to disease, according to a study by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation. It is, therefore, important that your dentist monitors the health of your wisdom teeth during your annual dental check-ups.

In general, dental and medical professionals agree that wisdom teeth should always be removed in the following instances:

•infections and/or periodontal disease;
•cavities that cannot be restored;
•pathologies such as cysts, and tumors, and
•damage to neighboring teeth.
Wisdom teeth that are completely erupted and functional, painless, cavity-free, in a hygienic environment with healthy gum tissue, and are disease-free teeth they may not require extraction. They do, however, require regular, professional cleaning, annual check-ups and periodic radiographs to monitor for any changes.

Wisdom Teeth Growth by Age

12 years

14 years

17 years

25 years
Wisdom teeth are easier to remove when the patient is younger, since their roots are not completely formed, the surrounding bone is softer, and there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves or other structures. Removal of wisdom teeth at a later age becomes more complicated as the roots have fully developed (may involve the nerve), and the jawbone is denser.

What Happens During Surgery?
If your dentist or healthcare professional recommends that your wisdom teeth be removed, you will most likely be referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for the procedure. Before surgery, your oral surgeon will discuss the procedure with you and tell you what to expect. This is a good time to ask questions. Also talk to your surgeon about any concerns you have. Be sure to let your doctor know about any illness you have and medications you are taking.

There are several conditions that affect how easy it will be to remove a wisdom tooth. These conditions include how the tooth is positioned and the stage of root development. If the wisdom teeth are impacted the surgery might be more complicated.

Most of the time third molars can be removed with little or no pain. Usually they can be extracted at the oral and maxillofacial surgery office. Patients are given either local anesthesia, intravenous sedation or general anesthesia. Your surgeon will recommend the anesthetic option that is right for you.

What Happens after Surgery?
Following surgery, you may experience some swelling and mild discomfort, which are part of the normal healing process. Cold compresses may help decrease the swelling, and medication prescribed by your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon can help manage the discomfort. You may be instructed to modify your diet following surgery and later progress to more normal foods.

What if I decide to keep my wisdom teeth?
If after discussing your situation with your family dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon, you decide to keep your wisdom teeth, be sure to take particular care in cleaning and flossing your teeth, especially the molars. Your third molars must be professionally examined regularly and x-rays of your wisdom teeth should be taken every year to make sure that the health of your teeth and gum tissue does not change.

[1] Ash M. Costich ER, Hayward JR: A study of periodontal hazards of third molars. Journal of Periodontology 1962;33:209

[2] Elter JR, Coumo CJ, Offenbacher S, et.al. Third molars associated with periodontal pathology in NHANES III. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2004; 62:440

[3] Elter JR, Offenbacher S, White RP, et.al. Third molars associated with periodontal pathology in older Americans. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2005; 63:179

[4] Stewart PS, Costerton JW: Antibiotic resistance of bacteria in biofilms. Lancet 2001;358:135

[5] Stewart PS, Costerton JW: Antibiotic resistance of bacteria in biofilms. Lancet 2001;358:135

[6] Sedghizadeh pp, Kumar SKS, Gorur A, et.al. : Identification of microbial biofilms in osteonecrosis of the jaws

The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), the professional organization representing more than 9,000 oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States, supports its members' ability to practice their specialty through education, research and advocacy. AAOMS members comply with rigorous continuing education requirements and submit to periodic office examinations, ensuring the public that all office procedures and personnel meet stringent national standards.

© 2005-2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). All rights reserved. — at American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS).See More

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Write a comment...Press Enter to post your comment.....Potomac Surgical Arts, P.C.
15 minutes ago.Summer is just around the corner...schedule your wisdom teeth removal while school's out! Did you know... Wisdom teeth are easier to remove, in younger patients? since the roots are not completely formed and the bone is softer, there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves and other structures.

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20 minutes ago.American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS)
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An estimated 36,000 new cases of oral and related cancers are diagnosed annually.
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[04/18/12]   Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, or third molars, are the last teeth to develop and appear in your mouth. They come in between the ages of 17 and 25, a time of life that has been called the "Age of Wisdom."

What is an Impacted Tooth?
When a tooth is unable to fully enter the mouth, it is said to be "impacted." In general, impacted teeth are unable to break through the gums because there is not enough room. Nine out of ten people have at least one impacted wisdom tooth.

How serious is an impacted wisdom tooth?
If left in the mouth, impacted wisdom teeth may damage neighboring teeth, or become infected. Because the third molar area of the mouth is difficult to clean, it is a site that invites the bacteria that leads to gum disease. Furthermore oral bacteria may travel from your mouth through the bloodstream, where it may lead to possible systemic infections and illnesses that affect the heart, kidneys and other organs. [1] [2] [3]

Research has shown that once periodontal disease is established in the third molar areas, the problem is persistent and progressive, but may improve following extraction of the teeth. [4] [5] [6]

In some cases a fluid-filled cyst or tumor may form around the base of the untreated wisdom tooth. As the cyst grows it may lead to more serious problems as it hollows out the jaw and damages surrounding nerves, teeth and other structures.

Complications such as infection (fig. a) , damage to adjacent teeth (fig. b) and the formation of cysts (fig. c) may arise from impacted teeth.

(a) Infection

(b) Damage to neighboring teeth

(c) Cyst
Must the tooth come out if it hasn't caused any problems yet?
Many people believe that as long as they are not in pain, they do not have to worry about their wisdom teeth. However, pain free does not mean disease or problem free. In fact, wisdom teeth that come in normally may still be prone to disease, according to a study by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation. It is, therefore, important that your dentist monitors the health of your wisdom teeth during your annual dental check-ups.

In general, dental and medical professionals agree that wisdom teeth should always be removed in the following instances:

•infections and/or periodontal disease;
•cavities that cannot be restored;
•pathologies such as cysts, and tumors, and
•damage to neighboring teeth.
Wisdom teeth that are completely erupted and functional, painless, cavity-free, in a hygienic environment with healthy gum tissue, and are disease-free teeth they may not require extraction. They do, however, require regular, professional cleaning, annual check-ups and periodic radiographs to monitor for any changes.

Wisdom Teeth Growth by Age

12 years


14 years

17 years

25 years
Wisdom teeth are easier to remove when the patient is younger, since their roots are not completely formed, the surrounding bone is softer, and there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves or other structures. Removal of wisdom teeth at a later age becomes more complicated as the roots have fully developed (may involve the nerve), and the jawbone is denser.

What Happens During Surgery?
If your dentist or healthcare professional recommends that your wisdom teeth be removed, you will most likely be referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for the procedure. Before surgery, your oral surgeon will discuss the procedure with you and tell you what to expect. This is a good time to ask questions. Also talk to your surgeon about any concerns you have. Be sure to let your doctor know about any illness you have and medications you are taking.

There are several conditions that affect how easy it will be to remove a wisdom tooth. These conditions include how the tooth is positioned and the stage of root development. If the wisdom teeth are impacted the surgery might be more complicated.

Most of the time third molars can be removed with little or no pain. Usually they can be extracted at the oral and maxillofacial surgery office. Patients are given either local anesthesia, intravenous sedation or general anesthesia. Your surgeon will recommend the anesthetic option that is right for you.

What Happens after Surgery?
Following surgery, you may experience some swelling and mild discomfort, which are part of the normal healing process. Cold compresses may help decrease the swelling, and medication prescribed by your Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon can help manage the discomfort. You may be instructed to modify your diet following surgery and later progress to more normal foods.

What if I decide to keep my wisdom teeth?
If after discussing your situation with your family dentist or oral and maxillofacial surgeon, you decide to keep your wisdom teeth, be sure to take particular care in cleaning and flossing your teeth, especially the molars. Your third molars must be professionally examined regularly and x-rays of your wisdom teeth should be taken every year to make sure that the health of your teeth and gum tissue does not change.

[1] Ash M. Costich ER, Hayward JR: A study of periodontal hazards of third molars. Journal of Periodontology 1962;33:209

[2] Elter JR, Coumo CJ, Offenbacher S, et.al. Third molars associated with periodontal pathology in NHANES III. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2004; 62:440

[3] Elter JR, Offenbacher S, White RP, et.al. Third molars associated with periodontal pathology in older Americans. Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2005; 63:179

[4] Stewart PS, Costerton JW: Antibiotic resistance of bacteria in biofilms. Lancet 2001;358:135

[5] Stewart PS, Costerton JW: Antibiotic resistance of bacteria in biofilms. Lancet 2001;358:135

[6] Sedghizadeh pp, Kumar SKS, Gorur A, et.al. : Identification of microbial biofilms in osteonecrosis of the jaws

The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), the professional organization representing more than 9,000 oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States, supports its members' ability to practice their specialty through education, research and advocacy. AAOMS members comply with rigorous continuing education requirements and submit to periodic office examinations, ensuring the public that all office procedures and personnel meet stringent national standards.

© 2005-2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS). All rights reserved.

[04/18/12]   Summer is just around the corner...schedule your wisdom teeth removal while school's out! Did you know... Wisdom teeth are easier to remove, in younger patients? since the roots are not completely formed and the bone is softer, there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves and other structures.

LikeUnlike · · Share

04/18/2012

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS)

aaoms.org An estimated 36,000 new cases of oral and related cancers are diagnosed annually.

04/18/2012

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons - AAOMS

April is National Facial Protection Month – encourage children to protect their face and teeth with the right kind of sports gear.

[10/27/11]   Botox Facebook Special $499 for your entire face during the month of November!

[10/20/11]   Take Advantage of our *** BUY-ONE-GET-ONE FREE *** on Latisse... while supplies last.

cosmeticsurgery.org 10/19/2011

American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS)

cosmeticsurgery.org Founded in 1985, the mission of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery is to advance the specialty of cosmetic surgery and quality patient care. Most members of AACS are dermatological surgeons, facial plastic surgeons, head and neck surgeons, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, general surgeons, pla...

aaoms.org 10/19/2011

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS)

aaoms.org Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons care for patients with problem wisdom teeth, facial pain, and misaligned jaws. They treat accident victims suffering facial injuries, place dental implants, care for patients with oral cancer, tumors and cysts of the jaws, and perform facial cosmetic surgery.

[10/18/11]   Winter is just around the corner...schedule your wisdom teeth removal while school's out! Did you know... wisdom teeth are easier to remove, in younger patients? since the roots are not completely formed and the bone is softer, there is less chance of damaging nearby nerves and other structures.

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[10/18/11]   www.latisse.com

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10/18/2011

Loudoun Oral & Cosmetic Facial Surgeon

potomacsurgicalarts.com Oral & Cosmetic Facial Surgeon in Leesburg. Providing Oral & Facial Cosmetic Surgery including Dental Implants to Loudoun County. 866-723-5373

[10/18/11]   We specialize in Immediate "Tooth in a day" Cosmetic Dental Implant Pacement.

Location

Category

Products

Obagi and NuDerm System

Telephone

Address


19440 Golf Vista Plz, Ste 130
Leesburg, VA
20176

General information

Affiliations: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), Virginia Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (VSOMS), American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (ABOMS), American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS).

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
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