Mary Sidawi D.M.D Family Dentistry

Dr. Mary Sidawi, DMD
General Family Dentistry

83 Llanfair Cirlce,
Ardmore PA 19003
610.642.2550

Operating as usual

Pulling wisdom teeth can improve long-term taste function | Penn Today 07/08/2021

Pulling wisdom teeth can improve long-term taste function | Penn Today

Pulling wisdom teeth can improve long-term taste function | Penn Today A Penn Medicine study shows, for the first time, positive long-term effects of third molar extraction on taste.

06/07/2021

Sparkling or not- Plain water is always the best choice.

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation—including sparkling water—has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).
So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth—and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth.
Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water—and Protecting Your Teeth
• Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too—it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities).
• Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
• Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember—sparkling or not—plain water is always the best choice.

Sparkling or not- Plain water is always the best choice.

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation—including sparkling water—has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).
So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth—and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth.
Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water—and Protecting Your Teeth
• Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too—it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities).
• Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
• Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember—sparkling or not—plain water is always the best choice.

05/07/2021

Blessings and love to all moms out there💕

Blessings and love to all moms out there💕

Timeline Photos 03/15/2021

#proudlyPenn/PDM

We are pleased to announce that among dental schools world-wide, Penn Dental Medicine moved up from a 2020 world-wide ranking of #22, and US ranking #7 to a 2021 world-wide ranking of #16, and a US ranking #5
https://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/university-subject-rankings/2021/dentistry
#DentalSchool #QSWorldRanking #PennDental

02/18/2021

Our office is closed today! Be safe everyone and happy snow day❄️

Our office is closed today! Be safe everyone and happy snow day❄️

An ‘electronic nose’ to sniff out COVID-19 | Penn Today 02/05/2021

An ‘electronic nose’ to sniff out COVID-19 | Penn Today

Interesting!

An ‘electronic nose’ to sniff out COVID-19 | Penn Today Through a newly funded grant, researchers across the University are developing a device that can rapidly detect COVID-19 based on the disease’s unique odor profile.

01/03/2021

Vaccinated✅

Vaccinated✅

12/31/2020

Best wishes for a happy and much healthier New Year🎉🎇

Best wishes for a happy and much healthier New Year🎉🎇

11/24/2020

We are humbled by the loyalty and the confidence of our patients. Your continuous support has lifted our spirits and buoyed our strength. We wish you a peaceful and joyous Thanksgiving holiday. Celebrate your blessings, enjoy time with your family, and most of all, please stay safe and take a good care.

We are humbled by the loyalty and the confidence of our patients. Your continuous support has lifted our spirits and buoyed our strength. We wish you a peaceful and joyous Thanksgiving holiday. Celebrate your blessings, enjoy time with your family, and most of all, please stay safe and take a good care.

The weirdest sign of COVID-19 fatigue? More Americans are grinding their teeth 11/20/2020

The weirdest sign of COVID-19 fatigue? More Americans are grinding their teeth

The weirdest sign of COVID-19 fatigue? More Americans are grinding their teeth The coronavirus pandemic is causing 'an epidemic of jaw muscle pain' across the U.S., dentists say

10/26/2020

Wear a mask, save a life.

09/24/2020

Wearing a mask is not only important, it’s life-saving.

09/04/2020

Wishing everyone a safe and happy Labor Day weekend!

penntoday.upenn.edu 08/27/2020

Existing drugs like statins may be promising COVID-19 treatments | Penn Today

penntoday.upenn.edu Commentary by two Penn researchers outline a systematic framework for repurposing existing drugs to quickly find new therapies, after an observational study suggested statins may be helpful in combating COVID-19.

07/10/2020

Happy Friday!

06/20/2020

University of Pennsylvania

Cancer researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania who study immunotherapy have shifted gears to address the need for a COVID-19 vaccine.

05/28/2020

Honored and thankful for voting me Top Dentist on The Main Line 2020.

05/14/2020

We hope that you and your family are staying safe and healthy. Our community has been through a lot over the last few months, and all of us are getting ready to adapt to the new normal life. While many things have changed, one thing has remained the same: our commitment to your safety.

Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the American Dental Association (ADA). We follow the activities of these agencies so that we are up-to-date on any new rulings or guidance that maybe issued.

You may see some changes when it is time for your next appointment:

- Our office will communicate with you beforehand to ask some screening questions. You will be asked those same questions again when you are in the office and asked to sign a consent form.

- We have hand sanitizer that we will ask you to use when you enter the office. We will use touchless forehead scan to check your temperature.

- You may see that our waiting room will no longer offer magazines, reading materials and so forth, since those items are difficult to clean and disinfect.

- Appointment will be managed to allow for social distancing between patients. That might mean that you are offered fewer options for scheduling your appointment.

- We will do our best to allow greater time between patients to reduce waiting time for you, as well as to reduce the number of patients in the reception area at any one time.

Thank you for being our patient. We value your trust and loyalty. We look forward to seeing you! And will be happy to answer any questions you may have about the steps we take to keep you, and every patient, safe in our practice.

Sincerely,

Mary Sidawi D.M.D

05/08/2020

Blessings and love to all the wonderful moms out there!

04/13/2020

We are most definitely missing all our patients! Hope you are staying healthy and positive.

04/01/2020

University of Pennsylvania

The Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania's FactCheck.org reports that rumors about ibuprofen worsening COVID-19 are unsubstantiated. The claim went viral on social media after the French health minister Olivier Véran tweeted about it mid-March.

03/23/2020

Pennsylvania Dental Association

On March 22, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) released new guidance stating that dental facilities and offices must close immediately, even for emergencies, if they do not have all of the following protective equipment and protocol in place:
• All personnel must follow proper protocol when donning and doffing personal protective equipment (PPE).

• All personnel must use N95 masks or higher; goggles or a face-shield covering face and sides; disposable gowns and gloves.

• Treatment must be provided in negative pressure isolation rooms with HEPA filtration.

DOH did not consult with PDA prior to releasing its guidance.

We are now working with the deans of Pennsylvania's dental schools and have already communicated our concerns to DOH and asked for clarification on a number of issues that now arise because of this.

PDA remains hopeful that we will be able to work with DOH to provide you with more information as soon as possible.

If you have questions about this DOH guidance, please contact [email protected].

Download PDA Go for more detailed information and immediate notifications when news is delivered. Available on Apple and Android devices.

03/17/2020

As always, we are focused on the health and well-being of our patients,staff, family and friends. In line with CDC and the American Dental Association guidelines, the office will be closed for few weeks. We will call to re-schedule all appointments. I will be available on an emergency basis through our regular line service 610-642-2550.
We encourage you to stay safe and do every possible precaution to stop the viral spread.
Be mindful and be healthy.
We are looking forward to open as soon as it is completely safe to all.

theconversation.com 03/10/2020

Coronavirus: Ten reasons why you ought not to panic

theconversation.com Pandemic does not refer to the lethality of a virus but to its transmissibility and geographical extension.

02/11/2020

Brush your teeth to protect your heart.
Happy Valentine's Day🌹

12/19/2019

HOW TO ENJOY THE HOLIDAYS WITHOUT DESTROYING YOUR TEETH

Eating and drinking sugary foods and drinks for prolonged periods of time increase your chances of gum disease and tooth decay. And let’s face it, there is nothing like a holiday get-together to keep folks mindlessly indulging on whatever is in front of them…for hours on end.
Now, while it would be ideal for our health, waistlines, and teeth to avoid certain fare altogether, barring the strongest willpower imaginable, it’s probably not going to happen. Celebrations beget temptations, and holidays are a time to relax, splurge, and enjoy.
A little preparation, however, can go a long way in managing dental health and damage control. Here are some things you can do that will help you enjoy the holiday season without destroying your teeth:
Eat sweets WITH (rather than after) your meal. The excess saliva will help wash down the sugar so it doesn’t linger on your teeth.
Drink plenty of water. Water cleans the mouth and produces saliva that deposits essential minerals that build tooth enamel. Water also keeps gums hydrated and washes away food particles from teeth.
Get plenty of rest during the holidays. A minimum of 8 hours’ sleep plays a role in your overall health, including your dental health.
Cheese contains natural cavity-fighting agents, as well as vitamins that strengthen teeth. The calcium and phosphate in cheese helps balance pH levels in the mouth, preserves tooth enamel, produces saliva, and kills bacteria that cause cavities and disease.
Fruits, such as apples, strawberries and kiwis, scrub your teeth when you eat them. When the natural fibers of the fruits combine with saliva in the mouth, they help wash away food particles and stain-causing bacteria.
Vegetables such as carrots, cauliflower, broccoli and cucumbers can help clean your teeth and gums by removing food particles that can build up into plaque.
Chewing on fresh herbs, like parsley, cilantro, and mint helps decrease odors caused by a buildup of bacteria. Put them in your salad!
It’s no surprise that sweets are not recommended when it comes to protecting your teeth and safeguarding your dental work, but some, while they may taste very nice, are particularly naughty. Be especially careful with:
Candy canes (teeth and dental work, beware!)
Peppermint bark (if your teeth are fragile, you should break this into small pieces and then dip the pieces into milk, coffee, or tea to soften)
Crunchy Christmas cookies (see Peppermint bark, above)
Caramels, taffy, peanut brittle, and pecan pie (the stickier the treat, the more damaging it is to your teeth)
Holiday drinks (eggnog, cider, and hot chocolate…oh, my)
Wine (red AND white cause discoloration and make holes in teeth)
Popcorn (be careful of kernels)
Fruitcake (there may be chewy dried fruit lurking within)
If you forget the specific tips above just remember this: if it’s good for your body, it’s good for your mouth…and vice versa.

11/26/2019

Grateful for the privilege of taking care of your smile.

10/29/2019

It is the busiest time of the year😉🎃Happy Halloween🎃🎃

10/01/2019

Admiring the Survivors, Honoring the Taken.

08/22/2019

😊

08/01/2019

We are happy to announce the 15 year anniversary of our practice! Thank you for your loyalty and support that made it possible. We are looking forward to be your partner in dental health for many more years to come.

[07/03/19]   Wishing you a sparkling 4th of July..Filled with pride, honor and lots of fun🇺🇸

05/10/2019

Happy Friday😃

05/02/2019

Could taking good care of gums and teeth also help to protect the brain? A recent study has added to growing evidence of a link between severe gum disease, or periodontitis, and a raised risk of dementia.

The term dementia describes a decline in mental capacity – such as increasing difficulty with memory and reasoning – that becomes so severe that it disrupts daily living. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.
Periodontitis is a common human disease in which the gums and the structures that support the teeth become inflamed due to bacterial infection. It usually starts as gingivitis, or inflammation of the gums.
Although the human mouth is home to a wide range of bacteria, when conditions are right, the bacteria populations can increase dramatically to cause inflammation. This usually happens when bits of food and bacteria deposit on tooth surfaces to form plaque.
The bacterial colonies in the plaque grow and produce toxins that trigger inflammation responses in the gums. If untreated, the inflammation becomes persistent and destroys bone, causing tooth loss.
The first mechanism through which periodontitis could cause dementia would involve bacteria from the infected gums entering the bloodstream and then crossing the blood-brain barrier into the brain. These could then trigger brain tissue inflammation and even spur production of the toxic proteins that are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.
Medical News Today recently reported research that makes a convincing case for such a causal link. In that study, researchers revealed that Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacterium that drives gum disease, can also be present in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.
The second mechanism would be a similar process in that the gum infection could set up a "systemic inflammatory state" that releases agents that promote inflammation. These agents could also cross the blood-brain barrier to trigger inflammation in brain tissue, which, if prolonged, can also contribute to toxic protein buildup.
The researchers suggest that the third mechanism would occur through damage to the lining of blood vessels. They note that evidence from previous research showed that such damage has ties to an increase in toxic proteins in the brain.
In combination with the recently published report on P. gingivalis, should make us all think more seriously about optimizing our own and our patients' oral hygiene practices and dental care, with the added potential of perhaps protecting our brain health as well.

Location

Category

Telephone

Address


83 Llanfair Cir
Ardmore, PA
19003

General information

Dr. Sidawi earned her DMD degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine in 2002. She is currently a clinical educator of restorative dentistry in the Department of Preventative and Restorative Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Sidawi practiced general dentistry in Philadelphia and the surrounding area before starting her own practice in Ardmore in 2004. Dr. Sidawi is proud to help improve the dental health among children in the Philadelphia area working one day a week for a non-profit organization, performing root canal therapy for children . Dr. Sidawi provides family dentistry with a comprehensive approach. She is committed to bringing a level of individual attention and care that is essential not only for beautiful smiles, but for comfort, well being, and overall health. Dr. Sidawi continues to keep abreast of current dental techniques and materials through many hours of dental education. Dr. Sidawi’s kind, caring, and compassionate approach to dentistry makes most nervous patients feel at ease the moment they meet her.

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 1pm
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